Former Lesbian and Teacher Fights Homosexual Agenda in Schools

L.A. WILLIAMS

When Linda Wall found out what was being taught in many U.S. schools about homosexuality, she was not only shocked and saddened, she was angry. A former lesbian and a former teacher, she knew she couldn’t sit back and let it happen, especially in her home state of Virginia.

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Virginia State Capitol
When Linda Wall found out what was being taught in many U.S. schools about homosexuality, she was not only shocked and saddened, she was angry. A former lesbian and a former teacher, she knew she couldn’t sit back and let it happen, especially in her home state of Virginia.

“One night I was surfing the Web and saw an article that said ‘AT&T sends pro-homosexual video to middle schools'," Wall said. “I kept looking and found 13 pages of pro-homosexual library books being put in the schools. I sat there and thought, is this happening in the whole country?”

“I can’t let this happen. They cannot be seducing children into what I was seduced into,” Wall said.

She contacted a friend in the Virginia House of Delegates and set to work investigating the promotion of homosexuality in the schools and what could be done to stop it. The result was House Bill No. 88, which would prevent public school presentations, classroom discussions and delivery of information in the family life curriculum regarding crimes against nature, which by definition in Virginia statutes includes homosexual acts.

Though the bill stalled in the Education Committee of the Senate last month, Wall said the issue is not dead. She and other family activists are already gathering evidence to strengthen their position for the 2003 legislative session.

“We’ve got a year to gather information on incidents throughout the State of Virginia. We want incident after incident to prove there is a need for the bill so there is no question in any legislator’s mind,” Wall said.

She has already heard about a number of cases where children, without parents’ consent, were introduced to homosexuality as a normal and acceptable lifestyle. One involved a homework assignment showing families with two women and a child and two men and a child.

“One of their techniques is to redefine the word ‘family',” Wall said of those promoting the homosexual agenda. “They are piggy-backing on diversity, trying to equate a behavior with culture.”

In another situation, a 16-year-old girl who was questioning her sexual identity was referred, by her school counselor and without her parents’ knowledge, to the organization Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG).

“Counselors are being trained to send the kids in that direction,” Wall said. “Homosexuality is being endorsed and promoted with wrong statistics and misinformation, and no alternative is being offered.”

Wall, who works with a group of concerned citizens called Saving America’s Foundation Enterprise (SAFE), said she does not want her efforts to be labeled an "anti-gay" campaign.

“I want this to be a campaign of truth,” she said. “I certainly don’t want anyone to be preyed upon. What I would like to see is for the homosexual and lesbian who would like a way out to know that there is a way out.”

Wall was in college when she had her first lesbian relationship, and was in the lifestyle for a decade before she said she became suicidal and asked the Lord for help. “After I surrendered and came out of the lifestyle, God led me back into teaching,” she said.

Wall taught in a couple of Christian schools and in a juvenile rehab program before going to work for the House of Delegates. She just finished a stint as a lobbyist for the Family Foundation of Virginia.

In addition to the introduction of HB88, Wall and others helped persuade lawmakers to defeat eight bills that she described as “anti-family.” She expects those eight and perhaps others to emerge again in January 2003.

One of those pro-homosexual bills would have reduced “crimes against nature,” the law that House Bill 88 is based on, from a Class 6 felony to a Class 4 misdemeanor. Another, a hate crimes bill, would have added “sexual orientation” to the category of victims, amplifying the penalty for assault or trespass against homosexuals. Still other proposed laws would give homosexual couples health insurance benefits and special protections regarding employment and housing.

“The only reason that people believe we need hate crimes legislation is because the truth hasn’t gotten out,” Wall said. “We hear about it when a homosexual is a victim, but anytime a homosexual is involved in committing a heinous crime, the media hushes it up.”

She pointed to this passage from Citizen magazine’s January 2002 issue: “A study released by the U.S. Justice Department has found an epidemic of violence between homosexuals — far greater than the amount attributed to anti-gay hate crimes. From 1993 to 1999, the study found an annual average of 13,740 male victims of violence by homosexual partners and 16,900 victims by lesbian partners. By contrast, the Justice Department’s most recent (1999) numbers for hate crimes based on sexual orientation totaled 1,558 victims.”

Wall points to the “anti-family” bills and the National Education Association’s recent stance on homosexuality as alarms that should spur parents and other concerned citizens into action.

“When I started investigating this thing, I saw that there was definitely an agenda out there to indoctrinate children into homosexuality,” Wall said. She said while she has often found parents who are upset by incidents in the schools, many of them are afraid or embarrassed to speak out, or else have tried but have been treated so poorly by school officials that they do not pursue it any further.

“One parent called me to say that they were adding oral sex to the curriculum at her child’s school,” Wall said. “They had questioned administrators about it, but were told that so many kids were doing it that they had to add it to the curriculum. The parents were made to feel so humiliated that they didn’t go any further with it.”

As in many states, in Virginia each school district has a lot of leeway regarding curriculum, which is one reason Wall and other pro-family activists are looking to pass a state law preventing the promotion of homosexuality in the classroom.

She is calling on parents to get involved and find out what is being taught at their children’s schools and then be willing to speak out if it is not acceptable.

“In 1993, the chant of homosexuals during the Washington Gay Pride Parade was ‘We’re queer, we’re here, and we’re coming after your children,’” Wall said. “And that’s exactly what is going on in our schools. There is no gay gene, people aren’t born homosexuals, so the only way to get people in the lifestyle is to recruit them. That’s how you spread your agenda.”

Still, she believes the battle can be won. “If we get enough parents involved, we will do it in Virginia. Then we’ll challenge every state in the country to follow suit.”

Though not as explicitly described as it is in the Virginia statutes, crimes against nature is against the law in North Carolina where it is considered a Class I felony.

 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

L.A. Williams. "Parents v. Television - Seven Steps to Sure Victory." Agape Press (April, 2002).

This article reprinted with permission from Agape Press.

THE AUTHOR

L.A. Williams writes for The Charlotte World, a weekly Christian newspaper in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Copyright © 2002 Agape Press




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